He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Son

Today’s theme: What They Should Know

“What is one thing you would tell someone that doesn’t have diabetes about living with diabetes? Let’s do a little advocating and post what we wish people knew about diabetes. Have more than one thing you wish people knew? Go ahead and tell us everything.”

Once again, my new friend, Meri, hit the nail on the head with this one. She actually wrote the post 2 years ago, but it does a phenomenal job of giving you just a peek at what a day in the life of a diabetic is. I encourage you to read it here.  Our Diabetic Life

But re-posting all of Meri’s posts kind of defeats the purpose of having my own blog, even though somehow she has all of my thoughts in her swelly brain. So I shall come up with my own version of basically the same concept.

“He ain’t heavy, Father…he’s my brother.”

This is the motto for Boys Town, a community formed in 1917 by a Catholic priest named Father Edward Flanagan. It is located in Omaha, Nebraska, where I grew up. Basically, it is the only incorporated village in the nation created exclusively for children in need of a fresh start in life.  It is a very cool place. But I have always loved this statue and the meaning behind it. It speaks to the very core of basic humanity. It doesn’t matter how hard it is, it needs to be done and, therefore, I will find a way to do it. (Kind of the deeper, more eloquent predecessor to Nike’s slogan, “Just Do It”, which is also one of my favorites).  Maybe growing up driving by that statue is why these feelings are ingrained in me.

But that is why I do what I do in regards to Medium’s diabetes. It sucks. And it’s hard. And it’s complicated. And it is exhausting. And if it doesn’t look like that to you, that is because we are KICKING ASS at managing his horrible disease. And it is manageable. But if we don’t manage it, for even a minute, he could die.

HE COULD DIE.

So, yes, when you see me at work, or up at one of the boys’ schools or activities, or wherever you see me, and it looks like everything is just hunky dory, that is because we are not going to stop living our lives and dwell on this. We are not going to walk around with our heads down and the letter D sewn into our chests.

But just because we are happy and smiling and seem to just check a blood sugar and punch a few buttons into a pump, doesn’t mean that diabetes isn’t a horrible, complicated, deadly disease with no cure.

Just know that behind the scenes we are working very hard to hit a moving target. (Again, please read Meri’s post, it really puts it in perspective. Here it is again so you don’ t even have to scroll back up to click the link!  Our Diabetic Life).

The one thing I want you to know about diabetes, is that I do what it takes, because he is my son.

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One thought on “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Son

  1. […] I have talked about Meri to my friends, family and coworkers ad nausem. And I have written about her and linked to her blog, multiple times in my own posts. I referenced her indirectly in “Did I Ever Tell You You’re My Hero?”. Gave her blog a shout-out in “I Have No Friends”, and shamelessly pimped her blog out not once, but twice, in “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Son”. […]

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